Weird paper mill observations

I was scanning through some of the google alerts I have set up just now and came across this site, EssayCapital.com, which appears to be a pretty traditional paper mill kind of outfit– you know, you pay them and they write the paper for you. Old-fashioned cheating.

I guess I was struck though by two things in looking through the site for a few minutes. First, they have a “blog” of sorts, one that seems to offer free advice to students on getting started with their own research papers. It’s not a particularly good blog nor does it seem to have very good advice (in fact, it seems to repeat entries quite a bit for some reason), but it does seem to be a way of getting credibility– in other words, I think the implied message here is “Hey, we must be professional and credible because we’re offering some basic advice for free! Would a paper mill do that? Heck no!”

And second, there were some other kind of funny aspects of the site. For example, from the FAQ:

My teacher is very sensitive to plagiarism issue. What is your policy on it?
As a well profound company that really values its customers’ impression we follow a zero-toleration policy concerning plagiarism. Moreover, as proof we are holders of the special anti-plagiarism system that is used by most universities in the US. Every single written order is checked prior to being sent to the customer.

And then there’s this clunker describing the folks working with EssayCapital.com:

Firstly, we employ the best writers available, and no other competitor can meet our level of professionalism. Every single writer has received a degree from a university in the United States, United Kingdom, or Australia. Their superior level is backed by diplomas (not like other companies who employ writers from India and Pakistan). Each writer employed by our company is a native speaker, and it does not matter how well a person knows English if he is a foreigner- he can not fully understand the culture of English writing.

Yikes.

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